Snowdon – The Llanberis Path

Setting myself the challenge of walking more of peaks in the UK, I took on the challenge of Snowdon, in Wales, and what a challenge it was!

Only taking a small amount of gear with me, I planned to reach Snowdon’s summit, take photos and head back down. I had no plans for a long stay or even camping on top. My gear consisted of;

  • Eurohike Nova 25l Daypack
  • Gelert Horizon Walking boots
  • Peter Storm double zip off trousers
  • Peter Storm tech tee
  • Canon 77D Camera with two lenses
  • Two tripods (Joby Gorillapod and Manfrotto tripod)
  • Peter Storm Cagoule, just in case the weather turns
  • Aladdin Waterbottle

Starting off the journey from home, I managed to reach the Llanberis car park in around 3 hours, no accidents or major traffic issues along the way made for a smooth journey. Head towards the Llanberis station for parking (postcode LL55 4TT), all day parking cost £8. Over the road was the station for the Snowdon Railway, so if you have booked train tickets up the mountain you are not too far away from your starting point. If you are looking for the Llanberis path, like myself, it is only a short walk around the corner to the beginning of the path.

Heading down victoria terrace to the very end, you reach a small gate with a cattle grid, continue up this path until you reach a fork in the road, where you head left on to the Llanberis path up to Snowdon’s peak. Be warned, this path is very steep and totally took me by surprise to begin with, as I was expecting a gradual incline. The fork in the road is very obvious as there is a large stone sign marking the direction of the path.

The path is known to be the “easier” route and the longest way to the top, but it is no way an easy path up. The path requires a higher level of fitness and very sturdy walking shoes as it is a long way up and down with any potential injury. Varying conditions of the path add to the challenge of the walk.

Around two-miles into the walk you reach the first of the railway bridges, once under the bridge, it is only another half mile until you reach the half-way house. In my opinion, the cafe on site is quite overpriced and have to pay to use the toilet, but if you did not prepare for the journey you have no choice but to use it. So please be wary of this if you plan a stop here. At this point, you have walked 2.5miles and an elevation 1,391ft up. Well done! but there is more to come!!!!

Half a mile further into the walk you reach what I believe to have been the hardest part, which is a steeper incline up towards the second railway bridge. The path is laid with rocks making it similar to climbing stairs at some points. The clearing at the top of the path by the railway bridge is a good place to stop and enjoy the view while you catch your breath.

 

Once past the bridge, you are on the final stretch to the peak. But do not forget to take in the view in front of you once through the tunnel, looking out towards the peak of Glyder Fawr. The last 1.2 miles with an elevation of 974ft its the last push to the summit, it is a test to get to the end, but the views are worth it so much!!

Once you reach the top you are potentially greeted by a hoard of other visitors who have either walked up the other paths or have taken the railway up. It was pretty busy inside and outside the cafe situated at the top, not to mention a little expensive too. But the less time spent in the cafe, the better really, as the views are unbelievable!

Spending time up on the summit, having a look around and viewing the summit point marker was time well spent, slowly recovering for the long walk back down the path. It took around 3 hours to reach the top. Following the path back down the way I came up, it took around 2 hours to reach the bottom with no stops and no photo breaks. The day was a total success with reaching the top on one of the longer paths. 100% going to do it again with more challenges on the horizon! So watch this space!

 

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